R E S T O R A T I O N

Myrtle Rust Rescue Ex-Situ Planting

‘From Common to Critical in less than 10 years.’

Program: Sat Oct 23, 2021, 10:00 am – 1 pm

Project start: Tue Nov 19, 2019 First collection of Myrtle cutting from Springbrook by Lui Weber, and delivered to Limpinwood Gardens Nursery for propagation.

Project finish: tba

Many will have heard of the Myrtle Rust disease that is attacking dozens of Myrtaceae species in the wild – Llllypillys, Rhodamnias, Rose myrtles, Paperbarks and many more. Few of us would realize just how much damage it has wrought on our native forest ecosystems. Three species once common in the Tweed are now on the brink of extinction and many more look set to follow.

Volunteer group Earth Learning has been collecting a selection of affected species and propagating them under license as part of a Saving Our Species initiative. The plants are direct clones of parents in the wild. The idea is to preserve a genetic representation of these iconic species, some with restricted range, which are barely hanging on in the wild.

For more information See Myrtle Rust Disease Rescue Project

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Conservation property at Farrants Hill in the Tweed Valley , is an Ex-Situ planting location for Myrtle rust affected native species.

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Conservation property at Farrants Hill in the Tweed Valley with existing native tree species.

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RESTORATION WALK TWEED RIVER EMBANKMENT

Program: National Landcare Program 25th Anniversary Landcare Grants 2014-15

Project start: 16-02-2015 Project finish: 30-06-2016

This project protects, restores and improves natural assets along a 150 metre stretch of the Tweed River embankment at McIlrath Park. Professionals helped to support the community and 60 volunteers to restore riverbank stability, ecosystem function, habitat connectivity, internationally significant species and ecological communities. Works included: the planting 1,600 local subtropical lowland rainforest plants; weed control; rubbish removal; media releases on conservation of habitat, biodiversity and threatened species; planting days; and art events for youth and sharing of indigenous ecological knowledge. These efforts helped create an open-air gallery that involves local youth in valuing rare and endemic local species of flora and fauna.

UPPER ROUS RIVER RESTORATION PROJECT

Earth Learning liaised with landholders in the headwaters of the Rous River, Border Ranges Alliance and Tweed Shire Council to initiate the Upper Rous River vegetation connectivity enhancement project in 2013.

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Laced Fritillary Butterfly Habitat Restoration

 

The project involved propagation and planting of Viola betonicifolia as a host plant for the endangered Australian Fritillary butterfly. Earth Learning and its members are involved in community education and the support for restoration of habitat to reduce threat of extinction of the endangered Australian Fritillary butterfly in Tweed and SE Queensland region.

This project supports ELs objectives: Community education – Youth education – Restoration of endemic and threatened species – biodiversity – habitat and ecological processes.